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slackware:network [2009/01/10 13:04]
alien A bit more emphasis on the WEP section.
slackware:network [2014/01/13 22:14] (current)
alien [WPA encryption] Typo fix
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   * There is a way to generate the hexadecimal value for the PSK if you have an access point which uses a passphrase. As root, run: <code>   * There is a way to generate the hexadecimal value for the PSK if you have an access point which uses a passphrase. As root, run: <code>
 wpa_passphrase YOURSSID passphrase wpa_passphrase YOURSSID passphrase
-</code> with the //YOURSSID// being the ESSID of your Access Point and //passphrase// is the ascii string you entered in the ccess Point's //WPA-PSK// configuration section. You'll receive an output, which looks like this: <code>+</code> with the //YOURSSID// being the ESSID of your Access Point and //passphrase// is the ascii string you entered in the Access Point's //WPA-PSK// configuration section. You'll receive an output, which looks like this: <code>
 network={ network={
     ssid="YOURSSID"     ssid="YOURSSID"
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 In Slackware, the way to start your network (the configuration of your //nics// and bringing the interfaces up, and creating a default route if required) is by running the command <code> In Slackware, the way to start your network (the configuration of your //nics// and bringing the interfaces up, and creating a default route if required) is by running the command <code>
-/etc/rc.d.rc.inet1+/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1
 </code> Restarting the whole network is done in a similar fashion: <code> </code> Restarting the whole network is done in a similar fashion: <code>
-/etc/rc.d.rc.inet1 restart+/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 restart
 </code> This is quite crude, and not adequate for the dynamic detection and configuration of network devices. Therefore, when your computer boots, and UDEV detects your network hardware, it will run the following command after loading the kernel driver and determining the name of the interface (let's assume that it is //wlan0//): <code> </code> This is quite crude, and not adequate for the dynamic detection and configuration of network devices. Therefore, when your computer boots, and UDEV detects your network hardware, it will run the following command after loading the kernel driver and determining the name of the interface (let's assume that it is //wlan0//): <code>
-/etc/rc.d.rc.inet1 wlan0_start+/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 wlan0_start
 </code> More generically speaking, you can start/stop/restart any network interface yourself by running one of the commands <code> </code> More generically speaking, you can start/stop/restart any network interface yourself by running one of the commands <code>
-/etc/rc.d.rc.inet1 INTERFACE_start +/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 INTERFACE_start 
-/etc/rc.d.rc.inet1 INTERFACE_stop +/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 INTERFACE_stop 
-/etc/rc.d.rc.inet1 INTERFACE_restart+/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1 INTERFACE_restart
 </code> </code>
  
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 Read more about it here: [[http://wicd.net/|http://wicd.net/]] Read more about it here: [[http://wicd.net/|http://wicd.net/]]
  
-Wicd installs a daemon which talks to your computer's //dbus// messagebus to detect network connects/disconnects. Configuration of your wireless as well as wired interfaces requires that you run X Window so you can use the graphical //wicd-client//.+Wicd installs a daemon which talks to your computer's //dbus// messagebus to detect network connects/disconnects. Configuration of your wireless as well as wired interfaces is done via a //wicd client//. You can either run the graphical //wicd-client// in your X Window session (KDE, XFCE, blackbox, ...), or use the console program //wicd-curses// if you are not using X.
  
-<note warn>If you want to use wicd, you will hav to remove any network interface configuration information from ''/etc/rc.drc.inet1.conf'' in order to prevent a struggle for power between wicd and Slackware's ''rc.inet1'' script.</note>+<note warn>If you want to use wicd, you will have to remove any network interface configuration information from ''/etc/rc.drc.inet1.conf'' in order to prevent a struggle for power between wicd and Slackware's ''rc.inet1'' script.</note>
  
 === lxnm === === lxnm ===

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