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Brabantse worstenbroodjes

Time for a new post about baking, a detour from the incessant talk about Slackware Linux and Open Source Software.

Today’s topic is “brabantse worstenbroodjes” aka dutch sausage rolls. I wrote about these worstenbroodjes on Google+ (in the Art of Baking community of G+) after I had baked a first batch early last year. Recently I revisited and revised the recipe when I made a new batch to “celebrate” my last day as an IBM employee. My colleagues loved them.
The most important revision is my spice mix, which is more complex than the simple initial attempt, which contained way too much salt. I also opted for pure beef instead of a pork/beef mix. These worstenbroodjes are halal / kosher.

Some background:

In March 2016, the brabantse worstenbroodjes were added by Unesco to the natoinal list of “immateieel cultureel erfgoed”. In english this is called the Intangible Cultural Heritage List. That sounds big, but actually it is simply a new way to preserve old traditions for future generations. In this case, a tradition originating in the southern region of the Netherlands: Noord-Brabant is a province of the Netherlands. Sausage rolls were initially created as a means to conserve meat by rolling the meat into bread dough and cooking it. Traditionally the brabantse worstenbroodjes were consumed only at special events with a religious context: at the end of Carnival, late tuesday night as a means to compensate for all the alcohol (further south people would consume herring on rye bread instead); and when coming home from night mass on Christmas Eve. Essential part of the tradition is that worstenbroodjes are meant to be shared with friends and family as part of a get-together event.

IMAG0744 worstenbroodjes

On to the recipe:

The brabantse worstenbroodjes are made from yeasted bread dough, which is wrapped around a sausage of beef & pork mincemeat spiced with salt, pepper, nutmeg, mustard (and other spices if you like, but the nutmeg is essential).

My recipe will create 30 worstenbroodjes consisting of 35 grams dough and 35 grams meat.

Dough:

  • 600 gr flour
  • 11 gr salt
  • 22 gr sugar
  • 170 gr water (lukewarm)
  • 170 gr milk (lukewarm)
  • 11 gr fast-action yeast
  • 45 gr butter (softened)

Sausages:

  • 1000 gr mincemeat (either beef or else a mix of beef and pork)
  • 1 egg
  • 25 gr spice mix
  • 25 gr breadcrumb

Spice mix (together will be ~ 25 gr):

  • 1 tsp salt
  • 2 tsp nutmeg
  • 2 tsp white pepper
  • 1 tsp paprika powder
  • 1 tsp onion powder
  • 1 tsp ginger powder
  • 1 tsp coriander powder
  • 1 tsp garlic powder

Execution:

  • Mix flour, sugar and yeast together in a bowl.
  • Combine the water and the milk and heat until lukewarm. Melt the butter and mix the salt and molten butter through the lukewarm fluid.
  • Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients. Mix together during circa 2 minutes with a spoon.
  • Leave this mix to rest for 15 minutes. The process is called autolyse – it ensures that the flour will absorb all the moisture.
  • Dump the dough onto your work area (which you dusted with a bit of four first) and knead for 6 to 10 minutes until you have a supple dough.
  • Place the ball of dough in a bowl and cover the bowl with some plastic wrap or a moist towel.
  • Next comes the “bulk rise” which is the period in which the yeast consumes part of the sugars in the flour which causes the dough rise to roughly twice the original volume.
    • Leave the covered bowl at room temperature for about an hour, or until the volume of the dough has doubled.
    • If you are adventurous and want a deeper, more complex flavor in your dough, don’t leave the dough at room temperature but instead, immediately place the bowl in the refrigerator for at least 10 to 12 hours, but mot more than 5 days. On the day you want to bake the worstenbroodjes you should take the dough out of the fridge 2 hours in advance to give it time to warm up to room temperature,
  • Divide the dough into 30 pieces of 35 grams each. Roll the pieces into small balls (see video below if you do not know how to do this). Cover the dough balls with plastic wrap or a moist towel.
  • While the balls are resting, mix the mincemeat with the egg and spices. Add as much breadcrumb as you need to create a firm meat mixture.
  • Divide the meat into pieces of 35 grams and roll them into sausages using the flat of your hand. The first video below shows you how. Store the sausages in the refrigerator while you work on the next step.
  • Use a small rolling pin to flatten the individual dough balls. Roll them into ovals that are roughly the same length as your sausages.
  • Combine dough and meat into a sausage roll: take a dough oval, place a sausage on top. Fold the ends of the oval over the ends of the sausage by stretching the dough a little. Grab a side of the oval and stretch it over the sausage.Take the other side and pinch the seam with two fingers. Roll the sausage roll under your two flattened hands to make the seam disappear and seal the meat into the dough completely.
  • Place the rolls on a baking tray which has been covered with a baking sheet (paper or silicone). Cover with plastic wrap and leave to rise at room temperature, for at least 45 minutes. This is an essential step. It will create air inside the bread and help prevent tearing of the sides of the bread roll while you are baking it.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 190 degrees centigrade (conventional oven).
  • Optionally if you want a nice shine on top of the worstenbroodjes, combine an egg with a tablespoon of cream and brush the bread rolls with the egg mix. I skip this step.
  • Bake the worstenbroodjes at 190 centigrade during 25 to 30 minutes until they are a golden brown.

When you want to add some extra complexity to the flavor, you should try making these rolls with a dough that has been developing in the fridge for at least 48 hours.

This is an ideal snack which should be eaten straight out of the oven but still tastes great the next day when cold. You can freeze them after baking if you want. Heat them up again when it’s time to eat them, straight from the fteezer into a pre-heated oven during 12 minutes at 180 degrees centigrade.

Video references:

Enjoy this recipe!

Java 7 (openjdk) gets a security update

icedteaMany people who have a need for Java, will already have switched to Java 8. Nevertheless there are still many places where Java 7 is preferred or even required. So, I am riding on the Q4 security updates for OpenJDK and used the recently released icedtea 2.6.8 to compile OpenJDK 7u121_b00 or “Java 7 Update 121 Build 00”. As always, there is a JDK and a JRE package.

Andrew Hughes has posted about this new release, and I copied the security related changes here:

Obviously, you are strongly urged to upgrade your OpenJDK 7 to this new release. Download locations for the JDK and JRE packages (Java 7 version):

The “rhino” package (implementation of the JavaScript engine used by OpenJDK) is an external dependency for OpenJDK 7, you can find a package in my repository.

Note about usage:

My Java 7 and Java 8 packages (e.g. openjdk7 and openjdk… or openjre7 and openjre) can not co-exist on your computer because they use the same installation directory. You must install either Java 7 or Java 8.

Remember that I release packages for the JRE (runtime environment) and the JDK (development kit) simultaneously, but you only need to install one of the two. The JRE is sufficient if you only want to run Java programs (including Java web plugins). Only in case where you’d want to develop Java programs and need a Java compiler, you are in need of the JDK package.

Optionally: If you want to use Java in a web browser then you’ll have to install my icedtea-web package too. While Oracle’s JDK contains a browser plugin, that one is closed-source and therefore Icedtea offers an open source variant which does a decent job. Note that icedtea-web is a NPAPI plugin – this prevents use of Java in Chrome & Chromium because those browsers only support PPAPI plugins, but you’ll be OK with all Mozilla [-compatible] browsers of course.

Have fun! Eric

Transitioning to a new GPG key

 

I have generated a new GPG key to replace my old one which was based on a 1024-bit DSA primary key. The new primary key is 4096-bit RSA. I will be transitioning away from my old one.

The old key will continue to be valid, but i prefer all future correspondence to use the new key. I would also like this new key to be re-integrated into the web of trust. The online version of this message is signed by both my keys (old and new) to certify the transition.

The old key was:

pub 1024D/A75CBDA0 2003-01-17
 Key Fingerprint = F2CE 1B92 EE1F 2C0C E97E 581E 5E56 AAAF A75C BDA0

And the new key is:

pub 4096R/769EE011 2016-08-21
 Key Fingerprint = 2AD1 07EA F451 32C8 A991 F4F9 883E C63B 769E E011

To fetch the full key (including a photo uid, which is commonly stripped by public keyservers), you can get it with either of these two commands:

wget -q -O- http://slackware.com/~alien/alien.gpg.asc | gpg --import -
 wget -q -O- http://alienbase.nl/alien.gpg.asc | gpg --import -

Or, to fetch my new key from a public key server, you can simply do:

gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --recv-key 769EE011

If you already know my old key, you can now verify that the new key is signed by the old one:

gpg --check-sigs 769EE011

If you don’t already know my old key, or you just want to be double extra paranoid, you can check the fingerprint against the one above:

gpg --fingerprint 769EE011

If you are satisfied that you’ve got the right key, and the UIDs match what you expect, I’d appreciate it if you would sign my key:

gpg --sign-key 769EE011

Lastly, if you could upload these signatures, i would appreciate it. You can either send me an e-mail with the new signatures (if you have a functional MTA on your system):

gpg --armor --export 769EE011 | mail -s 'GPG Signatures' alien@slackware.com

Or you can just upload the signatures to a public keyserver directly:

gpg --keyserver pgp.mit.edu --send-key 769EE011

Please let me know if there is any trouble, and sorry for the inconvenience.

Eric

Some reading material in case you too want to transition to a new key or even want to start using GPG:

Note:
The above text is based on a “gpg-transition-document” template which seems to be pretty widely used on the Internet for purposes of GPG key transitioning. My own text (the one of this blog post) can also be found here: http://www.slackware.com/~alien/gpg_transition_20160821.txt . That text file has been digitally signed with my old and new keys so that you can verify the correctness of my statements.

 

Slackware Live Edition 1.1.4 – based on slackware-current of 4 Nov 2016

blueSW-64pxToday I conclude my packaging frenzy with a new release of ‘liveslak‘. Version 1.1.4 is ready with only some minor tweaks. Users of the “iso2usb.sh” script on non-Slackware distros should be happy that the script finds all the required programs now.
I made a set of ISO images for several variants of the 64bit version of Slackware Live Edition based on liveslak 1.1.4 and using Slackware-current dated “Fri Nov  4 03:31:38 UTC 2016”. These ISO images have been uploaded and are available on the primary server ‘bear‘. You will find ISO images for a full Slackware, Plasma5 and MATE variants and the 700MB small XFCE variant.

Here are some screenshots of the PLASMA5 variant:

plasma5_login_5.8

SDDM login screen

plasma5_login_5.8_2

The new Plasma loading animation

plasma5_login_5.8_3

Plasma 5.8.3

plasma5_login_5.8_4

The logoff/shutdown

If you already use a Slackware Live USB stick that you do not want to re-format, you should use the “-r” parameter to the “iso2usb.sh” script. The “-r” or refresh parameter allows you to refresh the liveslak files on your USB stick without touching your custom content.

To find out what’s on the ISO you downloaded, try this command:

isoinfo -d  -i your_downloaded.iso | egrep “Volume id|Publisher id|Data preparer id|Application id”

And if you want to know what ISO was used to create your USB stick, check the content of the /.isoversion file in the root of its Live partition (partition number 3).

New in the ISOs

The new ISOs are based on the latest slackware-current with Linux kernel 4.4.29.

The SLACKWARE variant contains exactly that: the latest slackware-current and nothing else.

The MATE variant (a Slackware OS with KDE 4 replaced by Mate) has a refreshed ‘msb‘ package content,  I synced my local ‘msb‘ mirror with the official package repository at http://slackware.uk/msb/current/ which means you get Mate 1.16, the GTK3 version.

The PLASMA5 variant (Slackware with KDE 4 replaced by Plasma 5) comes with the latest Plasma 5 release “KDE-5_16.11” as found in my ktown repository. This ISO also contains the LXQT and Lumina Desktop Environments. Both are light-weight DE’s based on Qt5 so they look nice & shiny. The Plasma 5 packages inside the ISO already satisfy most if not all of their dependencies. Let me know what you think of Lumina and LXQT!
One word of caution when using the Lumina DE:

  • The network applet is not enabled by default, and you may have to enable the network manually. I used “nmtui” in a terminal window but you can try enabling the networkmanager-applet instead. I did not find out how, yet.

 

The changes between liveslak scripts 1.1.3 and 1.1.4

The ‘1.1.4’ tag was mainly applied to accompany the release of the new ISOs.

  • iso2usb.sh: get rid of hard-coded program pathnames in favor of searching a hard-coded $PATH . This should improve the usefulness of the script on non-Slackware distros.
  • make_slackware_live.conf: make the filename ‘min.lst’ customizable for Live distro developers.
  • PLASMA5: use the ‘latest’ instead of the ‘testing’ repository.

Download the ISO images

The ISO variants of Slackware Live Edition are: SLACKWARE, XFCE, PLASMA5 and MATE. These ISO images (with MD5 checksum and GPG signature) have been uploaded to the master server (bear) and should be available on the mirror servers within the next 24 hours.

Download liveslak sources

The liveslak project can be found in my git repository: http://bear.alienbase.nl/cgit/liveslak/ . That’s all you need to create a Slackware Live ISO from scratch. Documentation for end users and for Live OS developers is available in the Slack Docs Wiki.

Have fun! Eric

Q4 2016 fixes for Java 8 (openjdk)

icedteaThe icedtea project have released version 3.2.0 of their IcedTea build framework. This was done to mirror Oracle’s recent Critical Patch Update which brings OpenJDK to version 8u111_b14 or “Java 8 Update 111 Build 14”  (and the JRE too of course).

Here is the long-ish list of security fixes and CVE‘s as taken from the announcement on Andrew Hughes’s blog:

Download locations for the JDK and JRE packages (updates for Slackware 13.37 and 14.0 are still pending):

http://www.slackware.com/~alien/slackbuilds/openjdk/

http://bear.alienbase.nl/mirrors/people/alien/slackbuilds/openjdk/
(rsync URI: rsync://bear.alienbase.nl/mirrors/people/alien/slackbuilds/openjdk/)

If your applications are not yet ready for Java 8, I still maintain the Java 7 packages under new names:”openjdk7″ and “openjre7”. Note that my Java 7 and Java 8 packages (e.g. openjdk7 and openjdk) can not co-exist on your computer because they use the same installation directory.

There is no more need for a separate “rhino” package (implementation of the JavaScript engine used by OpenJDK) because in OpenJDK 8, this functionality is provided natively using the internal “nashorn” library.

Note about usage:

Remember that I release packages for the JRE (runtime environment) and the JDK (development kit) simultaneously, but you only need to install one of the two. The JRE is sufficient if you only want to run Java programs (including Java web plugins). Only in case where you’d want to develop Java programs and need a Java compiler, you are in need of the JDK package.

Optionally: If you want to use Java in a web browser then you’ll have to install my icedtea-web package too. While Oracle’s JDK contains a browser plugin, that one is closed-source and therefore Icedtea offers an open source variant which does a decent job. Note that icedtea-web is a NPAPI plugin – this prevents use of Java in Chrome & Chromium because those browsers only support PPAPI plugins, but you’ll be OK with all Mozilla [-compatible] browsers of course.

Have fun! Eric